Monthly Archives: January 2017

Clean Water is Priority for Lee County in 2017

Caloosahatchee River and Edison Bridge

Caloosahatchee River and Edison Bridge

 

 

 

 

 

 

Clean Water is a priority in Lee County in 2017 according to Lee County Board of Commissioners. The Lee County Commissioners layed out their priorities for 2017 and they are 1. Water Quality 2.  Land Conservation and 3. Justice, and improved services for Mental Health and Substance Abuse.

Water Quality has been a contentious issue for Lee County residents for several years because of the unsightly and harmful algae blooms and brown water that has been covering our beaches, canals and estuaries for several years. Last year was an especially bad year for dirty water coming down the Caloosahatchee River which was largely the result of large releases of water from Lake Okeechobee.

The Lee County Commissioners plan to ask for $1.38 million dollars from the state and to add an additional $2 Million dollars from the county for water quality improvement. The money will be spent over 4 projects including plugging wells to help out underground aquifers, rehabilitation of the Caloosahatchee River, improving the filtration system at Lakes Park and hydrological restoration at the Wild Turkey Strand Preserve.

The private sector organization in Lee County, Fla. named Calusa Waterkeepers is part of a worldwide organization called Waterkeeper Alliance which advocates clean water for the rivers, bays, lakes and other bodies of water in and around the Caloosahatchee Watershed. The Waterkeeper Alliance is made up of 300 affiliated organizations worldwide and their stated goal is swimmable, drinkable, and fishable water everywhere.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sunsets on Sanibel

Sunsets on Sanibel have been popular for vacationers and residents to enjoy because of the wide vistas and open skies in which to enjoy the views. The myriad of colors and variations of lights caused by clouds and the suns vanishing appearance draws many people to the beaches to see the sun disappear below the horizon.

Popular spots to see Sunsets on Sanibel are the beaches on the island along the Gulf of Mexico and the Sanibel Causeway Islands which runs across the Pine Island Sound and carries the 2 lane road which is the only access point to Sanibel by vehicle. It is not uncommon to see groups of people standing or seated along the beaches and causeway islands watching the sun set and disappearing below the horizon.

The actual time of sunrise and sunset varies of course depending on time of year. The City of Sanibel Web Site has a link which gives the time of sunrise and sunset in this area. It has the chart of tidal information for fisherman and the temperature of water for swimmers.

The pictures shown above were taken at different times of the year and display sunsets at different times of the evening. One of the prettiest sights to see are the rainbows across the sky near Sanibel after a rain storm. Click on one of the photos in this post to see a larger image.

http://www.mysanibel.com/Departments/Natural-Resources/Tides

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ding Darling Wildlife Refuge Film Series

The Ding Darling Wildlife Refuge Film Series will begin on Jan. 4th 2017. The film series will be held in the Visitor & Education Center auditorium and will be done biweekly on Wednesday’s through April 12th. There will be documentaries on subjects such as “Mullet: A Tales of Two Fish”, ” Million Dollar Duck”, “Sonic Sea”, and several other films. There will also be lectures by well known naturalists, photographers and scientists.  The Ding Darling Society website has a full list of the activities and things to see and do at the refuge.

The Ding Darling Wildlife Society is a non-profit volunteer organization that helps with environmental education, working in the visitor center and conservation of the J.N. Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge Complex. There are daily walks and tram tours given through the wildlife refuge by experienced guides. I have driven, walked and bicycled through the refuge myself and find any mode of transportation a good one. The road that winds through and around the refuge is several miles so those preferring to bicycle to and through the preserve should be physically fit. Wearing a hat, and wearing sun screen is advisable.

There is a concession business called Tarpon Bay Explorers that operates near the refuge that offers kayak and canoes for rent and also has boat rides through the wildlife refuge. Click on their link to learn more.  The pictures shown above can be enlarged by clicking on them.

 

 

 

 

Red Shouldered Hawk

The Red Shouldered Hawk is a  medium sized hawk that can be found along the eastern portion of the U.S., California and northern Mexico.They are raptors and hunt by swooping down from elevated positions in trees and the sky and eat fish, mice, snakes, crustaceans, snakes , frogs and other small animals. They grab their prey with their sharp and strong talons (clawed feet) and tear apart their prey with their sharp bills.

The All About Birds website created by the Cornell Univ. lab of Ornithology has very useful information about how to identify this bird , its life history and sounds that it makes. Click on  the Sound tab in the website and listen to its calls and sounds.

The Red Shouldered Hawk likes to inhabit areas in forests with tall trees and near water where a plentiful supply of fish and land animals can be found. It is very distinguishable from other birds by its white and brown checkered wings, reddish streaks on its wings and whitish belly.

Female Red Shouldered Hawks can lay up to 3-4 eggs per year. The female sits on the eggs during incubation period, usually 33 days. After the young hawks hatch they are cared for and watch by their mother for another 1-3 weeks in the nest. The male hawk will bring food to the mother and young during this time. The hatchlings will remain in the nest for about 5-7 weeks and be fed by their parents for 8-10 weeks.

Another good website to learn about Red Shouldered Hawks is the Audubon.org website. Click on the pictures above for a larger view.

 

 

http://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/red-shouldered-hawk