Algae Bloom on Our Beaches

Algae Bloom on Our Beaches

Algae Bloom on Our Beaches

Don’t worry, this picture is several years old and we haven’t seen this kind of algae pile up on our local beaches in SW Florida in several years. However it has happened several times within the last 15 years and it creates lasting impressions of the health of our lakes, rivers and estuaries. Scientists, the Environmental protection Agency and other groups have been studying what causes this problem but the culprit seems to be nitrogen, phosphorous, and human and animal waste being carried into our waterways by storm water runoff and excessive fertilizers being used too close to rivers and streams. The excessive loading of these pollutants causes the massive algae blooms and green scum that covers the water. I have seen thousands of dead fish lying on the shores of our rivers and beaches because of the excessive amounts of nutrients carried into our waterways. Florida is a heavily populated state with yards, farms and mining operations all playing a part in the problem. There are many efforts being made to prevent this excess nutrient pollution including building filter ponds and reservoirs to collect the pollutants and cleaning the water before being released into our estuaries. The Everglades Restoration Project is actually a massive effort to stop water pollution and to restore our wetlands to a healthy state.  We can all do our part to stop excess pollution from entering our waterways and to protect our beaches. The Florida Yards and Neighborhoods website published by the Extension Service of UFL provides good advice about using appropriate amounts of fertilizers on our lawns, choosing the right plants to use on our property and slowing down harmful storm runoff.  The Environmental Protection Agency has several projects being done to protect our waterways and gives useful information on their website about algae blooms. I have also learned a lot about flood control, water resource permitting and pollution control at the website of the South Florida Water Management District which has responsibility for some of our water quality issues.

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2 thoughts on “Algae Bloom on Our Beaches

  1. organicpond.com

    Thanks for writing this awesome article. I’m a long time reader but I’ve never
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    Reply
    1. Dave Post author

      Thanks for visiting and commenting on my nature and wetlands blog. I like your website as well.

      Reply

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