Burmese Python Snake Hunt

Burmese-Python-Snake - Picture Courtesy of SWFWMD

Burmese-Python-Snake – Picture Courtesy of SWFWMD

 

 

 

 

 

The annual Burmese Python Snake hunt in Florida began in January and has so far brought in 68 of the non-native reptiles. The largest caught so far measured 16 ft. 10 inches. and was caught by an official of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. The first year that this event was held was in 2013 and had 800 people registered and brought in 68 snakes. The Burmese Python snake is very difficult to find because of it’s camouflage skin and it’s ability to hide in the thick brush and water of the Everglades.

The snakes are having a harmful effect on Florida Wildlife because they have no known predators except very large alligators and they kill and consume all kinds of wildlife including deer, raccoons, rabbits, birds, rats and other animals. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission estimates that there are tens of thousands of the snakes in South Florida and were brought here originally as pets. Officials think they were let loose in the Florida Everglades by the hurricane that hit Florida in 1992 (Andrew) and by pet owners who could no longer care for their snakes as they got too large. The Burmese Snakes are native to Southeast Asia in countries such as India, lower China and the Malay Peninsula. They thrive in South Florida because of our warm and humid climate. To learn more about this invasive species, visit Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission website. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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